Berrissimo frozen yogurt opened recently on Brunswick St next to Babka. At the time it was the only shop of its kind in the immediate vicinity and added something new to Brunswick St. However, just across the road, in the location of the former Cruzao, a direct competitor called Frolic will soon open.

We’ve seen similar competition lead to the failure of a competitor in the past. Trampoline icecream opened on Brunswick St in 2004 and was followed by Timis gelato some time later. The latter closed in 2011 while Trampoline continues.

How much frozen yogurt does one street need? How much demand is there for this product heading into winter? How can two such businesses survive? I doubt they can. I predict one of these won’t last.

berrissimo how much frozen yogurt does Brunswick St need? frolic how much frozen yogurt does Brunswick St need?

how much frozen yogurt does Brunswick St need?

5 thoughts on “how much frozen yogurt does Brunswick St need?

  • 15 April 2013 at 10:35 am
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    Trampoline opened opposite that ice cream store with the cow as its mascot. I forget the name maybe Geramaines? It had been there for years.

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    • 15 April 2013 at 11:31 am
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      It was Charmaine’s, which closed in 2007 to be replaced by Juanita’s. So you could say that Charmaine’s was also a loser in the icecream war with Trampoline.

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  • 26 April 2013 at 12:44 pm
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    This is a bit like asking “How many generic NoodleBox franchises does Collingwood need?”

    The answer is obviously none. If only the business owners of would have asked themselves this before spending serious $$ on a retro industrial fitout for the ill fated NoodleBox located next door to Gorski and Jones on Smith Street. The place opened in December 2012, and unsurprisingly, after remaining empty almost every time we walked past, closed its doors in early March. Surely this type of business would have been better located in a suburban shopping centre.

    You really have to wonder about business plans for some of these ventures, and (in the case of Noodlebox at least) the role franchisers play in supporting/encouraging these bad decisions.

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    • 26 April 2013 at 2:09 pm
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      This is a particularly obvious failure that was inevitable. I’ve found that small business owners often don’t understand the culture of the location they are trading in. The owner of this franchise should have considered the culture of Smith St, the mix of food businesses there, the kinds of people who live locally and who visit, the kinds of food preferred by those people and their cultural preferences, such as their dislike of franchised food in favour of unique individual food businesses.

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