Fitzroyalty has some dedicated haters. I genuinely don’t know why they bother. If they don’t like what the site is about, why do they continue to pay it so much attention? Why don’t they focus their creative energies on their own projects instead of making pathetic attempts to undermine mine? I think the answer is they don’t actually have the talent to do anything original.

I wrote earlier this year about the use of the name Fitzroyalty and then expanded on it to explain its legal status. This followed on from my post late last year about the fake Fitzroyalty site that had been made at WordPress, which lead someone, presumably its creator, to stalk me online. After I started to take legal action, everything went quiet. The fake site was locked down and not available to the public, then its content was deleted and replaced with other irrelevant content.

But then things started to get busy again this winter. In July a single post site called Shitzroy appeared on WordPress (below). It criticised the Gertrude St Projection Festival for no apparent reason but I wonder if its creator had another agenda.

Shitzroy passive aggressive domain name games

Around the same time, a site with no content called I hate Fitzroyalty (below) appeared on WordPress, apparently responding to the original complaint I had made about the fake site dishonestly trying to misrepresent itself as the real thing and consequently misleading readers.

ihate passive aggressive domain name games

Also in July, someone has done what one of my commenters suggested someone do: register fitzroyalty.com. I have claimed that brand name domain names are not as important as they used to be, and I didn’t see the point in registering it myself. The domain is currently parked, and I doubt anything will appear on it soon. Whoever is making these sites evidently hasn’t got anything substantial to say.

In August, the fake site’s content was replaced with a fake advertisement for the Family Fi(r)st Party (below). It appears to be an attempt to annoy me, but it made me laugh out loud. I voted for the Australian Sex Party, and put the Family Fi(r)st Party last. It’s hilarious and utterly trivial.

familyfirst passive aggressive domain name games

I have no proof that the same person or people are responsible for all these sites, but it seems plausible to consider it the work of the same person. The only thing the meaningless peripheral stupidity I have outlined here demonstrates is that people find it difficult to ignore Fitzroyalty. Which is exactly what I want…

passive aggressive domain name games

9 thoughts on “passive aggressive domain name games

  • 26 August 2010 at 8:30 am
    Permalink

    I dont know why you bother giving them air time on here? Just ignore them.

    Reply
    • 26 August 2010 at 10:20 am
      Permalink

      That’s a fair point Carla. I write posts like this because I am interested in online behaviour and the psychology of it.

      We don’t know enough about why people behave the way they do online and what they want from online media. I see this response to the media I have created as something worth studying.

      I also have an interest in transparency so when something unusual like this happens I want to write about it and publish it in order to get feedback from others.

      Reply
  • 26 August 2010 at 11:33 am
    Permalink

    i don’t subscribe to the notion that any publicity/advertising/exposure is good, but there’s plenty of cases where it is. just not sure whether the cases you’ve outlined are. i think the fake Fitzroyalty late last year was (dishonest & probably jealous) flattery, but yeah, the rest is lowlife crap. definitely with you on the “if you don’t like it, why read it or give it any attention?”, but then, try saying that in a Youtube comment & you’ll be called a faggot/etc ;)

    i don’t mind you blogging about it, at least there’s a chance that irregular readers will cotton on to there being fakes & arsehats. but i really think you shoulda registered fitzroyalty.com(.au), purely to facilitate directing traffic from word-of-mouth recommendations of “that Fitzroyalty blog” :)

    Reply
    • 26 August 2010 at 12:03 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks for your comment Anthony. I think the domain name habit is deeply entrenched and hard to break.

      I think most people, having received a word of mouth recommendation, will try to find the site by searching for it rather than trying to write a URL from memory into their browser.

      Searching is so convenient and powerful now it makes remembering things like site URLs redundant, and this consequently makes a memorable domain names less important than they were a decade ago.

      This in turn makes time spent improving a site’s SEO a better investment than buying a domain name.

      Reply
  • 26 August 2010 at 12:05 pm
    Permalink

    Ahhh, it’s a poor, neglected poppet who’s learned that any attention (even if it’s bad) is better than no attention at all and who is doing their utmost to get you to “Look at me! Look at me!”.
    They obviously like you and your content enough to want to keep annoying you for attention (even if they don’t consciously recognise it as such), as they wouldn’t invest so much time and energy into something that doesn’t appeal to them.
    I’d hazard a guess as to this online behaviour being generated from people who feel disconnected from those around them in real life and this is both an attempt to find something to ground them as they identify with cyber reality more but in another way they are disconnected enough not to logically follow the sequence of events caused by their behaviour online as it’s ‘out there’ somewhere, the people involved are not immediately in front of them for them to witness the effects, causing a Catch 22.

    Reply
    • 26 August 2010 at 12:17 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks Jayne, I certainly agree that the anonymity of cyberspace and the lack of face to face emotional engagement makes people more spiteful and petty online than in the real world because their are no immediate or confronting consequences to their behaviour. What interests me is whether they understand the extent to which their behaviour defines their identity or reputation online.

      Reply
  • 26 August 2010 at 3:22 pm
    Permalink

    Just curious, Brian, but what makes you think that the “Shitzroy” blog has anything to do with an attack against you? It seems to me more like someone started a WordPress blog with the attempt to chronicle things they thought were over-rated in Fitzroy and then got bored of it after one post. It doesn’t seem to me to be an attach (passive aggressive or otherwise) on anybody, except perhaps the people behind the Gertrude St Projection Festival .

    Reply
    • 26 August 2010 at 3:36 pm
      Permalink

      I suppose it’s mainly the coincidental timing and the similarity (in terms of very little effort) to the other WordPress sites.

      Reply
  • 26 August 2010 at 4:56 pm
    Permalink

    I really don’t understand why people get so worked up over your opinions that they feel the need to create blogs which vilify you. If the blogs were for the purposes of humorous satire that might be different, but from what I’ve seen all these blogs seem to have far more malicious intentions.

    The entire thing confuses me – why do these people take your opinions so personally, and why do they think that creating a fake site will resolve the problem?

    You’re clearly willing to discuss things via the comments, or via email/phone if you’ve written something controversial or misleading. If these people feel their reputations have been harmed by your comments, these actions don’t help restore them.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *