Last night I received a spam email supposedly from Telstra, but it was not from a Telstra domain email but from this addesss: telstra_marketing@rnmk.com. I have never to my knowledge given Telstra my email address and I have never consented to receive marketing messages from them by email. The act of sending me this message is unprofessional, unethical and unacceptable. I thought about unsubscribing, but when I followed the link to the unsubscribe page I found a phishing scam – they expect me to tell them my full name and date of birth, as well as my email address, to unsubscribe. This is not necessary and may even be an unlawful invasion of privacy.

telstraspam1 Telstra sends out spam and phishing emails

Asking for all this personal information has all the signs of a phishing scam. All they need is for me to enter the email address to unsubscribe. I sent a reply email demanding they unsubscribe me. I also stated that if they contact me again I will report them to the police for stalking me. I consider this unwanted contact to be harassment and it must stop immediately. Telstra = fail.

telstraspam2 Telstra sends out spam and phishing emails

Telstra sends out spam and phishing emails

15 thoughts on “Telstra sends out spam and phishing emails

  • 23 October 2009 at 9:11 am
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    Sending a reply email won’t do any good – that address is not going to be read by a person. In fact it may do harm, as it will confirm to the spambot that your email address is valid. Of course, filling in the “unsubscribe” page would have been even worse.

    You should make a complaint to the ACMA: http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_310369

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  • 23 October 2009 at 10:47 am
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    you realise this has nothing to do with telstra right?

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    • 23 October 2009 at 11:08 am
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      That depends – the unsubscribe links points to a telstra.com.au web page. It is unclear whether the email is authorised by Telstra.

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  • 23 October 2009 at 11:23 am
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    this isn’t from Tesltra, it’s just designed to look that way. I have received emails from Telstra warning about this..

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    • 23 October 2009 at 11:50 am
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      The issue is the email (whether legitimate or not) points people to what appears to be a legitimate Telstra web page, which is where the phishing attempt is made. It is interesting to note that the domain the email is from (rnmk.com) resolves to http://www.rightnow.com, which appears to be a provider of CRM software and services for large corporations. My suspicion is that the email was authorised by Telstra.

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  • 23 October 2009 at 12:41 pm
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    Looks like a fake to me. Blaming Telstar is a bit like blaming the bank coz some spammer links to a legit bank website in their account phishing scam.

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    • 23 October 2009 at 1:44 pm
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      Let me make it simple for you. Forget the email. The website it points to is Telstra’s site. Telstra ask for personal information, including name and date of birth, simply to opt out of an email subscription. This is unnecessary. All they need to ask for is the email address to unsubscribe. They should not be asking for all the other details. To confirm identity they could use another piece of information, such as a customer ID number from a bill. Telstar is harvesting this information in an unethical manner.

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  • 23 October 2009 at 2:23 pm
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    Obviously we can’t tell for sure without seeing the full source of the email, but it’s not jumping out as a fake to me. The sender address @rnmk.com is the giveaway: it’s so easy to forge the sender address that it’s almost inconceivable that a phisher would fail to do so. And if ALL the links are to the real site (and not to a clever lookalike at teIstra.com or such) then it may really be from telstra.

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    • 23 October 2009 at 5:54 pm
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      All the links point to pages within telstra.com.au. The email appears to be genuine, but of course I did not give concent to receive it or to have my details provided to an external third party.

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  • 23 October 2009 at 2:55 pm
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    Don’t get me started on Telstra!! I too have received emails like this quite some time ago and discovered that Telstra had provided distributors with these sorts of details.

    I complained at the time but stopping this totally unethical company is a life’s work!

    Perhaps most of the comments you have receoved so far are from employees!!

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  • 24 October 2009 at 7:47 pm
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    This has NOTHING to do with telstra , just because it points to the website it won’t take you there , just like those emails from banks that pretend to be from the banks ,
    and don’t even go thinking that it is telstra’s problem because in fact it’s originating from a fishing site from the US ,
    and they have done many similar scams elsewhere .

    Wherever opportunity presents itself, people jump the gun and blame them , and ACMA is aware of the issue , and it’s been already proven to have nothing to do with telstra,
    anyone can creat a fake website , and anyone can pretend with any email,
    point 1 , the email is from a non Telstra link , that’s the FIRST give awa, point 2 , the actual links aren’t directed to a telstra server , they just have graphics that are designed to fool the average person out there,
    Point 3 , Telstra has had complaints from customers that have never been with them, some even overseas and they have never been on their data base ever, and i mean NEVER . and have no relation to them .

    the basic fact is that if you are going to make a quick irrational judgment based on just a phishing email that’s has all the tel tel signs of an impostor, then you are most likely going to make an irrational decision and go point the fingers before getting all the facts straight , like at least calling and asking if it’s for real.

    all you have to do is delete it and forget about it , and i’m sure most of the people out there receive MORE than just this type of email, why not complain about them also ?

    i received an email from AAPT asking if i received the phone i bought and if not , to “click” the link and re-enter my address and details to resend it,
    i don’t have anything to do with AAPT , and have never ordered a phone , but you can just imagine how many would have followed the link and entered all their info for a free phone. it wasn’t from them and i can clearly tel.

    oh yeah , Telstra doesn’t sent promotions by email untill you are a current active customer , or have bought or subscribed to a service that you’re using “like bigpond movies” .

    here are some infor about RNMK owners

    • “RightNow Technologies” owns about 33 other domains View these domains >
    • is a contact on the whois record of 27 domains
    • 1 registrar has maintained records for this domain since 2003-10-02
    • This domain has changed name servers 3 times over 6 years.
    • Hosted on 1 IP address over 4 years.
    • View 452 ownership records archived since 2001-05-08 .
    • Wiki article on Rnmk.com
    • 19 other web sites are hosted on this server.

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    • 24 October 2009 at 8:22 pm
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      I love it when the PR goons get hyperactive. The links in the spam email point to telstra.com and telstra.com.au including the opt-out page itself at https://telstra.com.au/edm/optout/index.cfm. That is a real page on the real Telstra site that asks for inappropriate information. The phishing activity is actually happening on the Telstra site. Your point 2 is WRONG. It does point to the Telstra site.

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  • 25 October 2009 at 2:37 pm
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    Nice ad hominem there. Mick is a PR goon because he raised some points against my own baseless Telstra hate…

    Why can’t the email just simply point to Telstra’s unsubscribe/opt-out page? How does it follow that Telstra was somehow involved in this spam? If you’re pointing out the fact that the unsubscribe page for Telstra asks for too much information – that is a completely unrelated matter.

    As you’ve done above, it is simple to link directly to the page, it is also simple to take the source code from other Telstra marketing emails or create your own Telstra marketing email. I won’t try to insinuate that this ISN’T a spam/phishing email, but as the “citizen journalist” that you are, it’d be nice to see some questions asked instead of just throwing around baseless statements like “Telstra sends out spam and phishing emails”.

    Why not instead provide the details of the email including links and ask the question “Is Telstra spamming me?”. Because that obviously doesn’t make controversial reading material I guess.

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    • 25 October 2009 at 4:57 pm
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      Yes, my post may have been better titled ‘Telstra uses its website to go phishing for confidential customer details’. The spam was actually helpful in pointing to it.

      Reply

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